Heyrocco headlines Hang Fire on Saturday night

In my column in Do this week, I wrote about the show tonight at Hang Fire headlined by Heyrocco from Charleston. And I’ve posted about the band a few times over the last couple of years, including here and here at hissing lawns.

Tonight’s show is another No Control Party (those efforts led by Angel Bond of CUSSES), and also includes DAMS, Hudson K, and Fare the Gap.

Here’s one of the videos that captures the somewhat-dark, high energy, occasionally angsty pop from Heyrocco’s recent Audiotree session in Chicago:

I’ve also taken some pics of the band in gigs at The Sparetime, at the No Control Fest last year at Southern Pine Company, at Taco Abajo for the 2013 Savannah Stopover, and even at a couple of house shows.

Here’s one, with more after the jump:

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Kylesa releases new video

Kylesa released a video today for Low Tide, one of the more mellow cuts off of this year’s excellent Ultraviolet. While the band often straddles the line between sludge metal and psychedelic rock, Low Tide is decidedly on the trippier side of things. The video is accordingly a strange and winding journey. Check it out.

This also seems like as good of a reason as any to post some photos from their free show at Dollhouse earlier in the year. More pics after the jump.

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Velvet Caravan launches Kickstarter for 1st album

If you have not heard Velvet Caravan, then you don’t really know what you’re missing. I was lucky to catch one of the sets that the group played beside the fountain in Forsyth Park at the recent Shalom Y’All Jewish Food Festival, but I guess I’ve seen them in at least half a dozen other venues over the last couple of years.

Check out this really excellent documentary video produced and directed by Peter Marra for Velvet Caravan’s “Acoustic in Nature” Kickstarter campaign.

From the campaign description:

After forming Velvet Caravan organically almost two years ago, we have decided to record an album capturing the essences of our unique style. Gypsy, Gypsy-Jazz, Honky-Tonk, Latin and Swing seem like an impossible musical combination, but after many months of playing together, an interesting sound has evolved. The style can be called a lot of things, but we always seem to best describe it as European Redneck Music.

This CD was recorded within three evenings with Kevin Rose, owner of Elevated Basement Recording Studio and the chief sound & recording engineer for the internationally-acclaimed Savannah Music Festival. Not ones to do things traditionally, we recorded all the songs onstage at Savannah’s historic Lucas Theatre. The natural acoustic environment (designed specifically for non-amplified instruments) proved essential in capturing the high energy of our live performances onto this album.

So click on through to the campaign and give Velvet Caravan a boost:

Click here for Velvet Caravan’s website.

Megan Jean and The KFB hit The 5 Spot on Friday

The 5 Spot in Habersham Village isn’t typically at the top of our list for live music recommendations, but the casual neighborhood restaurant and bar seems to have been putting a little more emphasis on its booking lately.

Case in point: Megan Jean and The KFB (the Klay Family Band) plays The 5 Spot on Friday evening.

The duo seems to spend the better part of the year on the road, with regular stops in Savannah. I haven’t caught a gig in a while, however. I guess the last time was at Live Wire Music Hall (now closed).

Larry Jack already has recommended Megan Jean and The KFB as one of his picks for the week.

Check out this truly awesome video for “These Bones”:

Larry Jack’s Magical Music Tour 11/12/13-11/18/13

I hope some of you made it out this weekend, there was some pretty good shows.  And Jackyl was at Forsyth Park on Saturday morning, definitely a Spinal Tap moment. There were a few good shows at Hang Fire (Fare The Gap and Buffalo Rodeo) and a very good bluegrass show at Congress Street Social Club from Seven Handle Circus. And the S.O.A.P! show at Molly MacPherson’s turned into a big party, what fun!

There are several interesting looking shows coming up this week. It looks like a week to put on your dancing shoes, lots of funk.  Here are my plans/recommendations. And don’t forget to check later, I will try to update as I get new information.

Tuesday 12th
Zachary Smith & Colleen HeineFoxy Loxy – Half of the Accomplices at this great venue.  It will be cold, so I bet it’s gonna be inside, which I like even better.

Wednesday 13th
Epic CycleWarehouse

Thursday 14th
Jon Lee’s ApparitionsWarehouse – Guitar rock from Jonathan Murphy and company.  They always put on a good show.

Danielle Hicks and The 8 Ohm Resistance – Zunzi’s II
Pillow TalkCongress Street Social Club (10p) – R&B, boogie and house music.  May be worth checking them out.

Friday 15th
Bottles & Cans – Rail Pub Courtyard (6-9p)Electric blues.  One of the best bands around town, be sure to catch them whenever you can.

Megan Jean & The KFBThe 5 Spot (8:30p)  – Husband and wife duo.  Gypsy-rock with a female washboard player.  Should be worth the ride to Habersham Village.

Epic Cycle Acoustic – Flip Flop Tiki Bar (9:30-1a) – Rare acoustic show with one of my favorite bands.
El DubMolly MacPherson’s (10p) – One-man funky reggae loops. Sounds interesting, I will probably stop by for a while.
Stereo ReformCongress Street Social Club (10p) – Dance-rock.  I’ve seen them before, they’re pretty good.
Quintron & Miss Pussycat, Jane PollockThe Jinx (10p) – Swamp tech.  Husband and wife duo, he is a solo instrumentalist, playing a Hammond Organ and several other instruments simultaneously.  The website says that he has invented several instruments.  Sounds like a good way to end the evening.

Saturday 16th

Telfair Babies – Telfair Square (Telfair Art Festival) (10-11:30a)

City Hotel – River Street Food & Wine Festival (12-3p)
Epic CycleMolly MacPherson’s (10p)
Funk YouCongress Street Social Club (10p) – Funk, reggae, jazz, and hip hop.  And a great name.
Dams, Heyrocco, Hudson KHang Fire – I’ll probably drop by here sometime during the night,  YouTube samples sounded pretty good.
Jason BibleZunzi’s II

 Monday 18th

Brett Trammell & Ben KeiserWarehouse (7p)

Craig Tanner & Mr. WilliamsAbe’s On Lincoln – Open Mic (9p)

The Casket Girls releases trailer for upcoming album, “True Love Kills the Fairy Tale”

I love the increasingly lush and eerie sound of The Casket Girls on this new trailer for the upcoming album True Love Kills the Fairy Tale, scheduled for release on Graveface Records on Feb. 11th:

Big Freedia is the best party you will ever attend

In the late 80’s and early 90’s, a subgenre of hip hop called Miami bass dominated the southern underground club scene.  Commonly known as booty bass, this style is characterized by MC’s hailing from Southern Florida or Atlanta rapping catchy hooks over loud samples and bass lines over 130 beats per minute.  It is different than rap in the same way as punk rock is different than hard rock.

The purpose of these southern club jams wasn’t to make you buy an album to listen to on a long road trip with your family. The purpose was to possess partiers and dancers to partake in some straight-up sweaty, raunchy, fast-action, don’t-let-your-mom-find-out-about-this rump shaking.

Modern ‘twerking’ has nothing on the lewd dancing during the Miami bass period.

Maybe you’ve heard of artists like 69 Boyz, Quad City DJs, or Freak Nasty – some of the few artists to rise above the underbelly of the short-lived subgenre – who made chart topping hits exposing the genre on a national level. The genre never made any real mainstream hype but heavily influenced the progression of party rap music throughout the 90s. The majority of Miami bass artists are unheard of or forgotten.

I am a huge fan of Miami bass music. I spend more free time than I probably should finding forgotten tracks to add to my “BOOTY MIXXX” playlist. I pump myself up before going to the bars on Friday nights blaring “Dickey Ride” by Southern Playaz. I daydream about wearing denim cut-offs amidst a crowd of 20-somethings during Spring Break 1990 and shaking my rump until I can’t breathe anymore.

This week I traveled to Atlanta to see Dip (who was seriously hilarious) and New Orleans’ Big Freedia and my entire life changed.

Savannah Stopover discounted early bird passes on sale

Savannah Stopover has early bird 3-day general admission passes on sale here for $60.

The regular price for the 3-day general admission pass will be $75. VIP passes ($125) and single day passes ($30) will also go on sale on Nov. 22. I’ve always been happy to pay for a VIP pass, which typically includes access to latenight parties and a farewell Sunday brunch that generally features some impromptu performances of bands (including Oberhofer in 2011) that haven’t left town yet.

We’ve already posted about the Stopover announcement party at The Jinx on Nov. 21 with Futurebirds, New Madrid, and Triathalon. Expect that show to sell out.

The 2014 Savannah Stopover runs from March 6-8.

Buffalo Rodeo, Fare the Gap Friday night at Hang Fire

Kind of a late announcement on this one, so you might not see this gig listed in the usual publications around town.

Buffalo Rodeo from Bowling Green, Kentucky, and Fare the Gap from Savannah will be performing tonight at Hang Fire on Whitaker Street. Click here for the Facebook event.

This looks to be another in a string of high-energy shows at Hang Fire.

new DEAD YET? record streaming on Bandcamp

Local hardcore/punk outfit DEAD YET?‘s new record is now available to stream or purchase on Bandcamp, and it sounds really good. Vinyl has been pressed and will be available for order soon, or better yet, picked up at a record release show that they are working on. I’m looking forward to it.

Here are a couple sketchy photos from The Sparetime, with DEAD YET? supporting Hoax.

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The embed from Bandcamp is after the jump.

Worth The Drive: Neutral Milk Hotel Reunion Tour (Athens, Atlanta)

Flash history lesson: In the early ‘90s, Louisiana transplant Jeff Mangum formed Neutral Milk Hotel, a band that could have audiences crowdsurfing and moshing or rooted to the spot they were standing in and weeping. Draped in dense fuzz and studded with horns, accordions, singing saw strains, and fevered poetic narration that boldly and vulnerably found love in the midst of tragedy, NMH made two studio albums, On Avery Island and In the Aeroplane Over the Sea. The latter is considered a masterpiece and icon, and is still topping charts like “Greatest Indie Rock Albums of All Time,” and “Top Albums of the 1990s.” More importantly, a lot of people connected with it on a visceral level, and still do to this day—as it’s often said, “Either you’ve never heard Neutral Milk Hotel, or they’ve changed your life.”

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Mangum and co. were part of The Elephant 6 Collective (E6), an Athens, GA-based group of musicians and artists who lived, wrote, played and potlucked together. While their band lineups are famously blurred—most projects center around one individual, with support from a rotating cast of E6ers and friends—E6 is responsible for indie, folk, psychedelic and twee staples like of Montreal, The Apples in Stereo, The Olivia Tremor Control, Elf Power, Gerbils, and numerous others, in addition to establishing Athens as the indie music capitol of the Southeast.

I was too young to have followed Neutral Milk Hotel when they were active–so for me and many E6 fans my age, the band fell into the Kurt Cobain-Elliott Smith “died young, stayed pretty” canon. When Mangum stopped playing shows as Neutral Milk Hotel in 1999, many of those affected by his music couldn’t understand it–one strong-willed reporter even wrote angered letters and spent months trying to “find” Mangum and demand an explanation as to why he wouldn’t make another record for the fans that connected so deeply with his work. But Mangum wasn’t hiding out in a cabin with his instruments collecting dust in the attic. There was never really a “break up,” as friends of the band have winked.

Black Tusk in “How to be a hardcore singer” video

Rock It Out! blog‘s “How to be a hardcore singer” video features Andrew and Athon of Black Tusk explaining how they maintain their fine singing voices night after night. You can struggle through the way over caffienated host’s shtick or jump to about 4:24 in the video to get right to Savannah’s finest. I don’t want to ruin it for you, but apparently they have never had vocal lessons and warming up for a gig (or being interviewed) involves drinking beer. Black Tusk rules.

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